The Modernist Great American Novel

I just finished John Dos Passos’ 1919, the second installment of U.S.A., one of the Great American Novels. When I looked for it on Bedford Avenue, the bookseller told me that not many people read him any more, which is a shame because he really is great. As Norman Mailer said, “Hemingway, Faulkner, Dreiser, and… Continue reading The Modernist Great American Novel

>Subjectivism

> By now you should be familiar with all my different modernisms: postmodernism, post postmodernism, metamodernism, etc. And while these all have bearing upon my work, I think it’s most important to articulate that my work is about one person. Hot Love on the Wing explores one subjectivity. Whereas modernism was about exploring different subjectivities… Continue reading >Subjectivism

>Thomas Wolfe’s Modernism

> Thomas Wolfe is a badass writer. Although he wrote Look Homeward, Angel at the height of the modernist movement, in 1928, he employs various postmodern techniques. For example, upon his birth he manages to remove some of the self-indulgence of writing a bildungsroman by asking the reader if you are familiar with what had… Continue reading >Thomas Wolfe’s Modernism